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Magic: Kremer Racing 1991 Kremer Porsche 962 CK6 Up For Sale

Submitted by on February 6, 2017

1991 Kremer CK6

Images via Jan B. Lühn

A classic from Kremer Racing’s stable of Porsche powerhouses, this 1991 Kremer Porsche 962 CK6 has 24 Hours of Le Mans history and is in as-new, ready-to-race condition. It’s up for sale at Jan B. Lühn.

From its foundation in the 1960s, Kremer Racing built up an enviable resume as a privateer team racing Porsches from customer cars to highly developed machines like the 935 K3 they used to win the 1979 24 Hours of Le Mans.

For the 1982 World Sportscar Championship, they developed the CK5 based on the 936 variants they had been racing up to that point. A few years later, the CK6 would be born from the Porsche 962C. Using drawings provided by Porsche, Kremer developed a new chassis that closely followed Porsche’s highly successful design, but used an aluminium honeycomb construction to improve rigidity and safety. These cars debuted at the end of 1986, and by 1988 had been designated CK6.

1991 Kremer CK6

This particular car was built in 1991 as one of two Kremer CK6s intended for Group C racing. It followed the then-current 962 specification, running a three-litre water cooled motor, Bosch Motronic 1.7 brains, wider track and independent rear wing.

Manuel Reuter, Harri Toivonen and JJ Lehto drove it to 9th in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, following the mighty Mazda 787B, a fleet of Jaguar XJR-12s and a Mercedes-Benz C11. A few months later it would take a podium and win Category 1 in the 430KM of Nürburgring with Manuel Reuter and Harri Toivonen piloting, following up with another Category 1 win at Magny-Cours.

1991 Kremer CK6

In 1992 the car returned to the 24 Hours of Le Mans, this time with Manuel Reuter, John Nielsen and Giovanni Lavaggi behind the wheel pushing it to 7th overall. 1993 saw it tackle Circuit de la Sarthe once more, now with Jürgen Lässig, Giovanni Lavaggi and Wayne Taylor handling driving duties.

Changes in regulations required a shift to open bodywork cars, so Kremer developed the K8 and upgraded this car to the new specification. It used the same chassis and running gear, sans roof and with new spyder bodywork.

1991 Kremer CK6

The car finally retired after the 1999 season and went into storage at Kremer until 2011, when it was sold to a Belgian collector. They had the car rebuilt to 962 specification by Mec Auto in Belgium with Kremer’s input. The restoration was fully documented and designed to allow the car to move between its 962 and K8 specification without significant development. It retained all of the K8 parts, the original body, original K8 chassis plate and dashboard as well as a spares package.

More recently the car has received more love and is presented as new, including a full rebuild of the motor back to to zero hours by Manfred Rugen.

Sold with a well-documented history file including original log books and Kremer documents, as well as a confirmation of authenticity from Kremer, this beautifully-presented Group C monster is ready to run. For the full details see the official Jan B. Lühn website here.

Images via Jan B. Lühn

1991 Kremer CK6

1991 Kremer CK6

1991 Kremer CK6

1991 Kremer CK6

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